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RIBA chartered member

Tom Turner Architects Limited

Company Number 10327550

Restoring the natural elegance of a listed house

 

Working closely with the client we have undertaken the careful remodelling and restoration of the house to draw out its natural elegance whilst adapting the spaces to create a layout suitable for modern family life.

Internal Photography by Jim Stephenson

 
 

Whilst the clients love the medievil charm of the existing farmhouse, the low ceilings and cellular spaces make family gatherings and entertaining difficult.

The new wing provides an open dining and sitting area with a double height space and views out over the gardens to the woods beyond.  

 
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Seaside nostalgia

The brief for this project was to create three guest bedrooms and a games room in a part of the site occupied by an existing garage. The main house was built in 1936 in a picturesque ‘Old English’ style typical of the expansion of West Itchenor in the 1920s and 30s when it became a popular seaside holiday destination. The garage, built in 1963 followed suit albeit choosing red brick and clay tiles in contrast to the white render and thatch roof of the house. 

The approach we took was to work with and accentuate the romantic qualities of the buildings by extending the length of the garage into a disused corner of the site with matching brickwork, adding a new ‘eyebrow’ window and re-roofing with reclaimed tiles.

The new guesthouse is deceptively spacious with three double bedrooms, two shower rooms and a large multi-purpose games room. The new oak staircase is lined with timber boarding painted nautical blue; a nod to the seaside location and the family’s love of sailing.

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Adding balance

We have been appointed to extensively overhaul and extend an existing Edwardian house on the site of a medieval farm. A previous scheme had sought to demolish and replace the existing house but we have chosen to work with the history of the site. By adding a third gable the austere frontage is softened and the composition balanced. The central portion of the house is given over to an entrance hall and stair that in one simple move unlocks the knotty plan and creates a pleasing flow of spaces.

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A new house with an old soul

By using the form and materials of the local area it is believed that the house will have an emotive quality that connects with its surroundings whilst offering a contemporary model for country living.

The form of the house is derived from the vernacular typology prevalent in the South East of England. The traditional model has been updated with contemporary detailing and an open plan layout.

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Informal generosity

Replacing a lower ground utility room, a new dining area has been created to open the kitchen out towards the garden and bring natural light into the heart of the house. The clients wanted a relaxed informal gathering space for the family which has been achieved by using simple materials and construction techniques. The exposed timber rafters slope up away from the neighbouring property to provide a generosity of space and light.

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Listed building consent has been granted to convert a 17th Century granary into a home office. The granary forms part of a grouping of barns that sit within the grounds of an Elizabethan farmhouse in the South Downs National Park.

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Evolving identity

We have been appointed to reconfigure the kitchen and dining spaces to evolve the identity of this handsome Italianate Villa. Ideas of light, axis and symmetry have informed the design to ensure continuity with the existing house whilst evolving the character of the space for a new generation.

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